News

News Type
Year
Month
  • Batteries To Power Long-Range Freight Trucks
    Batteries To Power Long-Range Freight Trucks
    Mon, April 12, 2021
    Anthony Eggert (JAFOE 2004) of the ClimateWorks Foundation writes that both battery-electric and fuel-cell long-range trucks can soon be engineered to out-compete diesel on cost while providing massive benefits for public health and the climate.
  • Food and Climate Change
    Food and Climate Change
    Mon, April 05, 2021
    Biosystems engineering professor Jason Hill (GAFOE 2013) at the University of Minnesota co-authored a recent study showing that we don't all have to go vegan to impact improvements to the big climate change problem caused by how we grow, eat, and waste food.
  • Strong as a BioPolymer
    Strong as a BioPolymer
    Mon, March 22, 2021
    At the University of California, Heather Maynard (JAFOE 2005) and Megan Valentine (USFOE 2014) are engineering new high-performance alternatives to petroleum-based polymers for strength, flexibility, and durability that can be produced sustainably from biological sources.
  • All-terrain Microrobot Flips Over Rough Muscle
    All-terrain Microrobot Flips Over Rough Muscle
    Mon, March 22, 2021
    Purdue mechanical engineer David Cappelleri (GAFOE 2015) is engineering a robot as tiny as a few human hairs that can travel throughout a colon by doing back flips directly to its target site, which could reduce side effects that the drug may cause by interacting with other organs along the way.
  • Organ-on-a-Chip Monitoring System for Chemotherapy
    Organ-on-a-Chip Monitoring System for Chemotherapy
    Thu, March 18, 2021
    FOE alum Ali Khademhosseini of the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation has engineered an organ-on-a-chip to monitor how breast cancer chemotherapy can affect tissue damage to the heart, the heart's pumping ability, or clinical heart failure.
  • Surviving Weed-Out Classes in Science May Be a State of Mind
    Surviving Weed-Out Classes in Science May Be a State of Mind
    Mon, March 15, 2021
    Ainissa Ramirez (USFOE 2004) of Science Underground discusses how weed-out classes in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disproportionately hinder underrepresented groups, including women, Black, Native American, and Hispanic people, from pursuing STEM degrees.
  • Critical All-Season Infrastructure
    Critical All-Season Infrastructure
    Mon, March 08, 2021
    Carnegie Mellon's Constantine Samaras (EU-US FOE 2016) discusses how systems engineering could help alleviate major energy and resource supply and demand problems like the recent loss of power, heat, and water to a huge swath of Texas.
  • Tracking Role of Macrophages in Cancer
    Tracking Role of Macrophages in Cancer
    Thu, March 04, 2021
    Melissa Skala (USFOE 2020) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is engineering a process to better reveal macrophage function and behavior, which play a major role in contributing to the growth and metastasis of many cancers and varies widely across patients.
  • Nevertheless, She Persisted
    Nevertheless, She Persisted
    Thu, February 25, 2021
    Even when she's the only woman or person of color in a room full of engineers, Stanford's Debbie Senesky (USFOE 2016) shares how her resilience, adaptability, and determination have helped her engineer solutions for the aeronautics, astronautics, healthcare, and automotive industries.
  • Beetle Models Structural Strength
    Beetle Models Structural Strength
    Mon, February 22, 2021
    Pablo Zavattieri (USFOE 2014) at Purdue University is taking engineering cues from the exoskeleton of the diabolical ironclad beetle, which could inspire the design of aircraft gas turbines that are safer and longer lasting.
  • Heated Face Mask
    Heated Face Mask
    Thu, February 18, 2021
    NAE member Michael Strano (USFOE 2007) at MIT has designed a reusable mask with heated copper mesh powered by a battery and surrounded by insulating neoprene that can filter and inactivate coronaviruses.
  • A Nano-Needle To Modify Plant Genes
    A Nano-Needle To Modify Plant Genes
    Mon, February 08, 2021
    Markita Landry (USFOE 2017) at the University of California, Berkeley is engineering carbon nanotubes that can penetrate cell walls to alter genes, which could lead to breeding new varieties of crop plants faster and easier.
  • New Book - Mercury Stories
    New Book - Mercury Stories
    Thu, February 04, 2021
    In Mercury Stories, MIT's Noelle Selin (EU-US FOE 2019) examine sustainability from a systems engineering approach by analyzing human interactions with the volatile and toxic element over thousands of years.
  • Discrimination in Health Research Funding
    Discrimination in Health Research Funding
    Mon, February 01, 2021
    Kristyn Masters, Lori Setton, Elizabeth Cosgriff-Hernandez, Muyinatu Bell, Stacey Finley, Naomi Chesler, Karen Christman, Joyce Wong, and Tejal Desai argue that racial funding disparity by the National Institutes of Health remains a significant barrier to success of Black biomedical engineers.
  • 3D Printing Microfluid Channels for Medical Testing
    3D Printing Microfluid Channels for Medical Testing
    Thu, January 28, 2021
    FOE alum Michael McAlpine at the University of Minnesota has engineered a process to 3D print without a cleanroom, which means that diagnostic tools could be printed by a doctor right in their office or printed remotely by soldiers in the field.
  • Perils of Working from Home
    Perils of Working from Home
    Mon, January 25, 2021
    Burcin Becerik-Gerber (USFOE 2013) at the University of Southern California discusses how ergonomic engineering can address the toll on mental and physical health caused by working from home.
  • Hastening Vaccines and Treatments
    Hastening Vaccines and Treatments
    Thu, January 21, 2021
    MIT's Ram Sasisekharan (IAFOE 2006) engineers breakthrough biological therapeutics for emerging infectious diseases and drug-resistant infections using a rapid response strategy that dramatically reduces production time from several years to just a few months.