News

News Type
Year
Month
  • Early Detection of Cancerous Cells
    Early Detection of Cancerous Cells
    Thu, March 21, 2019
    FOE alumni and NAE members Angela Belcher and Paula Hammond at MIT have engineered an imaging system that can detect tumors made up of a couple of hundred cells deep within the body, an advance that could lead to earlier cancer treatment.
  • For This Robot's Next Trick, a Backflip!
    For This Robot's Next Trick, a Backflip!
    Fri, March 15, 2019
    MIT's Sangbae Kim (USFOE 2016) has engineered an updated Mini Cheetah robot that can run at five miles per hour, bound across uneven terrain, and even rapidly right itself when it is pushed over.
  • Fighting Climate Change Using Natural Gas
    Fighting Climate Change Using Natural Gas
    Thu, March 14, 2019
    Rice University's Matteo Pasquali (USFOE 2008) is engineering a process to break down natural gas into valuable carbon nanotubes and hydrogen that manufacturers can use to produce clean electricity.
  • Robotic Muscle from Spider Silk
    Robotic Muscle from Spider Silk
    Mon, March 11, 2019
    FOE alum Markus Buehler at MIT has discovered that spider silk, already known as one of the strongest materials for its weight, turns out to have another unusual property that might lead to new kinds of artificial muscles.
  • Fibers That Are Stretchy But Tough
    Fibers That Are Stretchy But Tough
    Thu, March 07, 2019
    Michael Dickey (USFOE 2014) at North Carolina State University has engineered fibers that combine the elasticity of rubber with the strength of metal, creating a material that could be incorporated into soft robotics or super-tough textiles.
  • Spiking Tool Improves Artificially Intelligent Devices
    Spiking Tool Improves Artificially Intelligent Devices
    Mon, March 04, 2019
    Brad Aimone (USFOE 2017) at Sandia National Lab has engineered a software tool that sharpens the output of artificial neurons, enabling neural computer networks to process information up to a hundred times more efficiently than the current industry standard.
  • Developing New Materials Using AI Technique
    Developing New Materials Using AI Technique
    Mon, February 25, 2019
    FOE alumni Ju Li at MIT and Subra Suresh at Nanyang Technological University used machine learning to identify the most energy-efficient strain pathways that could transform diamond into more effective semiconductors. Strain engineering has wide implications for technology in general.
  • Strong Like Titanium, Light Like Wood
    Strong Like Titanium, Light Like Wood
    Thu, February 07, 2019
    FOE alum Paul Braun at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has engineered a sheet of nickel with nanoscale pores that make it as strong as titanium but four to five times lighter.
  • Using Bacteria to CLEAN Water
    Using Bacteria to CLEAN Water
    Mon, February 04, 2019
    Young-Shin Jun (EU-US FOE 2016) at Washington University in St. Louis has engineered a novel water filter that uses bacteria to kill bacteria twice as fast as commercially-available ultrafiltration membranes. Scaling up could help provide clean drinking water for the more than one in 10 people in ...
  • Prosthetic Knee With a Quick Learning Curve
    Prosthetic Knee With a Quick Learning Curve
    Mon, January 28, 2019
    FOE alum He (Helen) Huang at NC State and UNC at Chapel Hill has engineered a powered prosthetic knee that enables users to walk comfortably in minutes rather than several hours thanks to its intelligent 'tuning' system.
  • 3D Printing for Spinal Cord Injuries
    3D Printing for Spinal Cord Injuries
    Thu, January 24, 2019
    Shaochen Chen (CAFOE 2015) at the University of California, San Diego is engineering a 3D printed spinal cord that promotes nerve growth and restores connections and lost function.
  • Monitoring Blood Flow Wirelessly
    Monitoring Blood Flow Wirelessly
    Thu, January 17, 2019
    FOE alum and NAE member Zhenan Bao at Stanford is engineering a biodegradable, battery-free arterial-pulse sensor to wirelessly monitor blood flow, an advance that could allow doctors to remotely monitor the success of blood vessel surgery.
  • The
    The "Henry Ford" of Autonomous Vehicles
    Thu, January 10, 2019
    FOE alum Chris Urmson leads Aurora, the developer of a full-stack self-driving software system for automobile manufacturers. Aurora is collaborating with a number of automotive retailers to integrate its technology into their vehicles and make self-driving cars a “practical reality.”
  • Using Solar Heat for Hygiene in Remote Regions
    Using Solar Heat for Hygiene in Remote Regions
    Mon, January 07, 2019
    FOE alum and NAE member Gang Chen at MIT reports that his lab is engineering a device that can use solar heat to turn water into superheated steam. The development may one day enable sterilization in medical settings and provide clean drinking water, both persistent problems in developing countries.
  • Nerve Regeneration Using Bioelectronics
    Nerve Regeneration Using Bioelectronics
    Thu, January 03, 2019
    FOE alum and NAE member John Rogers at Northwestern University has developed a device that delivers electrical pulses to damaged peripheral nerves in rats, which then have accelerated nerve regrowth and enhanced muscle strength and control. The wireless device is the size of a small coin and ...
  • New Material With Promise for Osteoarthritis
    New Material With Promise for Osteoarthritis
    Thu, December 20, 2018
    FOE alum and NAE member Paula Hammond at MIT has engineered a new molecule that can administer drugs deep into cartilage in an effort to help reverse or slow the tissue breakdown associated with osteoarthritis, which affects 20 to 30 million people in the US.
  • Wriggling Fish Insights May Improve Robot Design
    Wriggling Fish Insights May Improve Robot Design
    Mon, December 17, 2018
    Johns Hopkins University's Noah Cowan (EU-US FOE 2010) studied the constant and seemingly random movement of fish that serves to optimize their sensory feedback, leading to ways to improve sensors in robot design.