News

News Type
Year
Month
  • Chemical Weapon Afterlife
    Chemical Weapon Afterlife
    Thu, December 05, 2019
    The University of Central Florida's Subith Vasu (2019 EU-US FOE) has discovered how long it takes for toxic chemical compounds to deteriorate in the intense fire of an explosion, as well as the chemical product residues that remain after their destruction.
  • Illuminating Biology at the Speed of Life
    Illuminating Biology at the Speed of Life
    Thu, November 21, 2019
    FOE alum Elizabeth Hillman at Columbia University has engineered microscopy that reveals unseen details of living creatures with far superior resolution and at speeds up to 30 times faster than previously possible.
  • Building STEM Equity
    Building STEM Equity
    Mon, November 18, 2019
    FOE alum Naomi Chesler at the University of Wisconsin has launched a new entity to increase STEM productivity and creativity by educating people, departments, and institutions about best practices in diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  • A Printable Semiconductor from a Failed Cancer Drug
    A Printable Semiconductor from a Failed Cancer Drug
    Thu, November 14, 2019
    Many potential pharmaceuticals end up failing during clinical trials, but Ying Diao (USFOE 2017) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is engineering organic semiconductors for use in chemical sensors and transistors from biological molecules once considered for cancer treatment.
  • This Gel Could Prevent Wildfires
    This Gel Could Prevent Wildfires
    Mon, November 11, 2019
    Stanford's Eric Appel (JAFOE 2018) has engineered a nontoxic, biodegradable gel that can be sprayed on wildfire-prone vegetation as a long-term fire retardant.
  • Greener Chemistry Through Elusive Fungi
    Greener Chemistry Through Elusive Fungi
    Thu, October 17, 2019
    Michelle O'Malley (USFOE 2018) at the University of California, Santa Barbara was among the "SN10 Scientists to Watch" for her studies of anaerobic gut fungi that allow many herbivores to turn grass into energy using enzymes that might one day make fuel and chemical production more sustainable.
  • Just When You Thought It Was Safe to Drink the Water
    Just When You Thought It Was Safe to Drink the Water
    Mon, October 14, 2019
    NAE member and FOE alum David Sedlak at UC Berkeley explains that US drinking water regulations are based on a complex balance between health risks from possible carcinogens and the cost of implementing new water cleaning systems.
  • Low-Energy Alternative For Chemical Separations
    Low-Energy Alternative For Chemical Separations
    Tue, October 08, 2019
    Georgia Tech's Mark Losego (USFOE 2018) is engineering metal oxide-infused membranes to reduce the energy needed by distillation processes, which consume a massive amount of energy each year separating and refining feedstocks to make gasoline, plastics, food, and other products.
  • Improving National Water Security
    Improving National Water Security
    Thu, October 03, 2019
    FOE alum Karl Linden at the University of Colorado Boulder is engineering energy-efficient and competitive desalination technologies to secure a circular water economy in which 90% of nontraditional water sources can be cost-competitive with existing water sources within 10 years.
  • Using Hydrogels to Repair Heart Muscle
    Using Hydrogels to Repair Heart Muscle
    Tue, October 01, 2019
    FOE alum Karen Christman at the University of California, San Diego has engineered an injectable hydrogel to repair cardiac tissue in patients who have suffered a heart attack.
  • Antineutrino Detection Could Help Remotely Monitor Nuclear Reactors
    Antineutrino Detection Could Help Remotely Monitor Nuclear Reactors
    Mon, September 09, 2019
    Georgia Tech’s Anna Erickson (USFOE 2015) has engineered a method to measure the flow of subatomic particles known as antineutrinos from nuclear reactors. This continuous remote monitoring is designed to detect fueling changes that might indicate the diversion of nuclear materials.
  • Adapting Polymer Printing for Better Electrical Conductivity
    Adapting Polymer Printing for Better Electrical Conductivity
    Thu, September 05, 2019
    Ying Diao (USFOE 2017) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has engineered the polymer printing process to stretch and flatten twisted molecules so that they conduct electricity better for use in new, faster biomedical devices and flexible electronics.
  • New Horizons for Unmanned Air Traffic Control
    New Horizons for Unmanned Air Traffic Control
    Thu, August 29, 2019
    FOE alum Rahul Mangharam at the University of Pennsylvania has engineered an unmanned system that works like a three-dimensional GPS for the sky to coordinate air traffic for small aerial vehicles such as drones and air taxis.